Debian/Backups

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Revision as of 21:32, 1 November 2016 by Mutante (Talk | contribs) (Created page with "<pre> < pingfloyd> normally, I wouldn't worry about backing up executables < pingfloyd> easier to just reinstall if disaster strikes < pingfloyd> ryouma: what about "reinstal...")

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< pingfloyd> normally, I wouldn't worry about backing up executables
< pingfloyd> easier to just reinstall if disaster strikes

< pingfloyd> ryouma: what about "reinstall" directive?
< pingfloyd> e.g., aptitude reinstall ...
< mutante> what can be nice to have a backup of is the list of installed packages, just that tiny file you would get from dpkg --get-selections. then you can 
                 restore it even easier

< somiaj> !aptitude clone
< dpkg> To clone a Debian machine using aptitude (or install your favourite packages) use aptitude search --disable-columns -F%p '~i!~M!~v' > package_list; on 
              the reference machine; xargs aptitude --schedule-only install < package_list; aptitude install; on the other machine.  This preserves information about 
              "automatically installed" packages that other methods do not.  See also <reinstall>, <things to backup>, <debian clone>, <apt-clone>.
< somiaj> mutante: I like that over --get-selections because it saves autoinstall info

< missmbob> i like <debian clone> since not all machines have aptitude

< pingfloyd> the problem with --set-selections is it marks it all as manually installed

< pingfloyd> mutante: here's another alternative: apt-mark showmanual > pkg_list; then on target; xargs apt-get install < pkg_list